Öffentliche Vortragsreihe im Rahmen der Masterclass “Parallaxen des Wissens” unter der Leitung von Prof. Dr. Charlotte Schubert (Alte Geschichte) und Prof. Dr. Stefan Kramer (Sinologie), Sommersemester 2012.

Vortrag von Prof. Dr. Erhard Schüttpelz
Prof. Dr. Erhard Schüttpelz (Universität Siegen), “Guter Rat. Eine medienanthropologsische Übung”. Montag, 16.7.2012, 18.00-19.30, Schillerstraße 6, Raum S 102.

Vortrag von Prof. Dr. Peter Ludes
Prof. Dr. Peter Ludes (Jacobs University Bremen), “Chinese, German and US Televisions: Long-Term Power Shifts”. Dienstag, 3.7.2012, 14.00-15.30, Neues Seminargebäude, Raum S 202.

Vortrag von Prof. Dr. Winfried Nöth
Prof. Dr. Winfried Nöth (Universität Kassel), “Selbsreferenz in den Medien”. Montag, 2.7.2012, 18.00-19.30, Schillerstraße 6, Raum S 102.

Vortrag von Prof. Dr. Christian Kassung
Prof. Dr. Christian Kassung (Humboldt-Universität Berlin), “»Figures of Invention«. Die Patentgeschichte der Bildübertragung”. Montag, 18.6.2012, 18.00-19.30, Schillerstraße 6, Raum S 102.

Vortrag von Prof. Dr. Michael Giesecke
Prof. Dr. Michael Giesecke (Universität Erfurt), „Prä- und posttypographisches Denken“. Montag, 11.6.2012, 18.00-19.30, Schillerstraße 6, Raum S 102.

“Freunde aus der Ferne ……”
Sinologische Gastvorträge an der Universität Leipzig
Sommersemester 2012

1.  Vorführung des Dokumentarfilms „Bored in Heaven: A Film about Ritual Sensation“ (über volksreligiöse Feste in der chinesischen Provinz Fujian), anschließend Diskussion mit den Autoren: Prof. Kenneth Dean (McGill University, Montreal, Kanada) & Prof. Zheng Zhenman 郑振满 (Universität Xiamen, VR China). Montag, 7.5.2012, 15:00–17:30, Konfuzius-Institut Leipzig, Otto-Schill-Str.1.

2. “All the Books in Indra’s Net: Textual Communities and Buddhist Religious Diversity in Contemporary China.” Prof. Gareth Fisher, Syracuse University (Syracuse, NY, USA). Montag, 14.5.2012, 17:00–18:30, Konfuzius-Institut Leipzig, Otto-Schill-Str.1.

3. “Sprachkulturen aus der interkulturellen Sicht ‚Chinesisch-Deutsch’“. Prof. Zhu Jianhua 朱建华 (Tongji Universität, Shanghai). Dienstag, 29.5.2012, 15:00–16:30, Konfuzius-Institut Leipzig, Otto-Schill-Str.1.

Vortrag von Dr. Ulrich Volz

Das Institut für Wirtschaftspolitik und das Ostasiatische Institut der Universität Leipzig ladenherzlich ein zu einem öffentlichen Vortrag von Dr. Ulrich Volz (Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik, Bonn) zum Thema “Die Internationalisierung des chinesischen Yuan – Die neue Weltwährung?”. Der Vortrag findet statt am Freitag, 27.4.2012, 14:00-16:00 im HS 16, Hörsaalgebäude der Universität Leipzig, Universitätsstraße 7.

Vortrag von Dr. Ulrich Volz

Das Ostasiatische Institut der Universität Leipzig lädt herzlich ein zu einem öffentlichen Vortrag von Dr. Ulrich Volz von dem Deutschen Institut für Entwicklungspolitik, Bonn, zum Thema Chinas Rolle in Ostasien und der Weltwirtschaft. Der Vortrag findet statt am Freitag, dem 9.12.2011, 17:00–19:00, im HS 6, Hörsaalgebäude der Universität Leipzig, Universitätsstrasse 7.

“Freunde aus der Ferne ……”
Sinologische Gastvorträge an der Universität Leipzig
Sommersemester 2011

1. Prasenjit Duara, National University of Singapore
“The Historical Roots of Secularism in China”
Dienstag, 14. Juni, 17:00 – 19:00 s.t.
Schillerstr.6, S202

Abstract: China has largely escaped the conflicts between faith based communal religiosities characteristic of Abrahamic and other religions through most of its history. Thus it has been relatively immune to politicization of faith-based communities which has confounded the problem of religion and politics in so many parts of the world. However, it has not escaped a different type of conflict over religion, one that is vertical rather than lateral: between state and elites versus popular religiosities. I want to explore the roots and implications of this division for our understanding of Chinese state and society in an exercise in comparative historical sociology.

2. Gabriel Wu, City University of Hong Kong
“When the Body Enacts Memory: Zhang Ailing’s All Teenage Schoolmates Were Equal”
Mittwoch, 15. Juni, 15:00 – 17:00 s.t.
Schillerstr.6, S302

Abstract: Critics have long commented about the lack of talent and literary luster in the works Zhang Ailing (aka Eileen Chang, 1920-1995) produced after she left mainland China for America in the mid-1950s. Apparently, in comparison to those composed in the 1940s when she obtained overnight fame, Zhang Ailing’s post-1950 writings are plain and uninspired in their diction and metaphors. Yet this does not necessary mean a reduction in her creativity, as many have believed. Quite contradictory, this speaker would argue, Zhang had in her later stage of life ventured into new terrain to search for a new narrative mode, and this can be summarized under Edward Said’s term “late style.” One of the prime features of Zhang’s late style is her deliberate employment of body to enact memory. As seen in her fiction All Classmates of Early Years Are Not Poor, written between 1973 and 1978 but published posthumously in 2004, body which is hidden beneath detailed, delicate description of garments in the early works is consistently uncovered, not only to underscore the social and psychological difference between the characters, but, more important, to generate suggestive remembrance of the past and negotiate for a new narrative space. It is such stylistic exploration that allowed Zhang Ailing to reach new milestone of her literary writing in the foreign land.

3. Pan Wenguo 潘文国, East China Normal University, Shanghai
“”Confucius on xue 学 (Learning)”"
Mittwoch, 22. Juni, 15:00 – 17:00 s.t.
Schillerstr.6, S302

4. Paul R. Katz, Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica, Taipei
“Judicial Rituals in Postwar Taiwan”
Donnerstag, 30. Juni, 15:00 – 17:00 c.t.
Schillerstr.6, S302

Seiten: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8